Let’s start with what you know…

  

Research shows that the majority students preparing for their BIG exam retain about 65-70% of the content from their course work that they need to do well on their board , bar or entrance exam. They just need to get over that 30-35% hump to ensure that they pass or score well.

The problem is, how do you know what you know and what you don’t know?

Most students prepare for their big exam by studying from the very beginning. They try to absorb 2-4 years of content in the 8-12 weeks of preparation that they allocate for their review. This is an impossible task. It’s like trying to drink the ocean in one big GULP.

Part of the strategy that we employ is to ask our professors how they would approach the problem of consuming so much information in a short amount of time. The other part is focusing on what a student knows and what he/she does not know. This requires the mapping of each individual’s knowledge base within the structure of our review courses to see where a student’s strengths and weaknesses lie.

That’s where our assessments come in. We track your knowledge base for each topic of each subject covered in your exam.

Why is that important? By understanding what you know and what you don’t know, you can focus on those areas of content that you’re weakest in and less on the strengths of your knowledge base. Essentially, we make your review process more efficient.

Want to know the best part? We also track your guesses.

Why is tracking the number of guesses important? It’s because we don’t you to get a false positive or a false sense of confidence if you did well on an assessment.

For example, if you scored an 85% on an assessment for a specific topic but found out that you guessed on 65% of the questions, it would indicate that you may not know the content all that well. Understanding what you know and what you don’t know if important in preparing for any exam.

A professor recommended approach to review combined with the ability to customize our course based upon each individual student’s knowledge base makes for a comprehensive and effective review strategy. What are you waiting for?